BABIES DEVELOPMENT

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Baby’s development in the womb

Owing to the fact that i have a lot of pregnant and intending preggies as friends and colleagues i thought it will be nice to share this piece after coming across it along while ago. im not a doctor nor a nurse but you can be sure when it comes to BABIES i can go to lengths on finding information on them, right from sex to their youth-hood.

In this description, we have adopted the method doctors use. For example, where we write ‘week 8’ we have counted this from the first day of your last period — your baby will usually only be 6 weeks old at this point.
How doctors date your pregnancy

The average pregnancy lasts for 38 weeks from the date you conceive (this is called conception). However, doctors usually date your pregnancy from the first day of your last menstrual period — that is the day your last period started. Using this method a pregnancy is said to last 40 weeks (280 days).

Your due date is usually calculated as 40 weeks from the first day of your last period. However, fertilization of your egg by sperm happens a day or 2 after ovulation, which occurs in the middle of a 28-day cycle, and then it is a couple of days before the fertilized egg implants in the uterus, so for the first 2 weeks of the 40-week ‘pregnancy’ you are not actually pregnant at all.

First month

After the egg has been fertilized by the sperm, it starts to divide into more cells. This happens all the time it is carried along the fallopian tube to the uterus. By the time it reaches the uterus the fertilised egg has become a cluster of cells which float in the uterine cavity until it embeds in the wall of the uterus. This implantation in the wall of the uterus is when conception is complete. This is roughly 4 weeks after day one of the last menstrual period if you have a 28-day cycle.

Second month

At 5 weeks the embryo is the size of a grain of rice (about 2 mm long) and would be visible to the naked eye. It has the beginnings of a brain with 2 lobes and its spinal cord is starting to form.

At 6 weeks of ‘pregnancy’ (3-4 weeks after fertilisation) the embryo has a head with simple eyes and ears. Its heart has 2 chambers and is beating. Small buds are present that will form arms and legs later. The beginnings of the spine can be seen and the lower part of the body looks like a tail.

embryo at 6 weeks

At 7 weeks, the limb buds have grown into arms and legs. Nostrils can be seen on the embryo’s face. The heart now has 4 chambers.

At 8 weeks, the eyes and ears are growing, and your baby is about 2 cm long from crown to rump. The head is out of proportion with the body and the face is developing. The brain and the blood vessels in the head can be seen through the thin skin. The bones in the arms and legs start to harden and elbows and knees become apparent. Fingers and toes can also be seen.
Third month

What is known as the embryonic period finishes at the end of week 8 and the fetal period begins. This period sees rapid growth of the fetus, and the further development of the organs and tissues that were formed in the embryonic period.

fetus at 11 weeks

At week 9 the head is almost half the crown to rump length of the fetus. Then the body grows substantially in length until by week 12, the head is more in proportion. By the time you are 12 weeks’ ‘pregnant’, your baby is just over 5 cm long from crown to rump.

Its body is fully formed, including ears, toes and fingers complete with fingernails. The external genitals appeared in week 9, and now, by week 12, have fully differentiated into male or female genitals. By week 12 the eyes have moved to the front of the face and the eyelids remain closed together.
Fourth month

Your baby may suck its thumb now. By 14 weeks your baby will be about 9-10 cm long. Its body is now covered with a layer of fine hair called lanugo. By 16 weeks its face is becoming more human in appearance, although the chin is small and the mouth is quite wide. Between 16 and 24 weeks you should feel your baby move for the first time — it may at first feel like butterflies.
Fifth month

The rapid growth that your baby has been experiencing now begins to slow a little. By week 20 your baby measures about 18 centimetres from crown to rump and is half as long as it will be when born. The legs are now in proportion with the body and the fingernails are well developed. Faint eyebrows are visible. At this stage, you will feel your baby moving about a lot, often when you lie down.

fetus at 20 weeks
Sixth month

By 24 weeks your baby’s organs are fully formed. The baby now has the face of a newborn baby, although the eyes are rather prominent because fat pads are yet to build up in the baby’s cheeks. The eyelids are fused until weeks 25 to 26 when they open.

The skin is wrinkled, red and thin with little underlying fat. The skin is covered with a waxy substance called vernix, which protects it while it is floating in the uterus. The body is well muscled, but still thin. The baby has become better proportioned, with the size of the body catching up with the size of the head.

Your baby’s hearing is also well developed by this stage; the baby will respond to noise.
Seventh month

By 28 weeks lanugo hair has almost gone and hair is present on the head. Fat is being deposited under the skin.
Eighth month

Your baby is becoming plumper. By 30 weeks the toenails are present and by 32 weeks the fingernails have reached the ends of the fingers. The baby’s eyes will be open when the baby’s awake.

By about 32 weeks the baby will have settled into a downward position as there is no longer enough room left in the womb for it to move about freely. You will feel occasional vigorous jabs of the baby’s arms and legs.

If your baby is a boy, his testes will migrate down into the scrotum in the 8th month.
Ninth month

Sometime between 36 and 40 weeks, the baby’s head will engage — that is, the head will be lying just on top of your cervix. By 40 weeks, your baby should be plump and healthy.

The lanugo hair that had covered your baby has now mostly disappeared, although some hair may remain low on the forehead, in front of the ears and down the center of the back. The toenails should have reached the tips of the toes.
Full term

By full-term, your baby should weigh about 2.7 to 3.5 kg, although full-term babies can weigh anything from 2.5 to 5 kg, and measure 35 to 38 centimeters from crown to rump and 44 to 55 cm from the baby’s head to its toes. These are just average figures, though, and there can be wide variation in the measurements. So now, 38 weeks after conception, your baby has all its organs and body systems ready for the big moment when it is born into the world.

Aisha n Josh 11

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Months after leaving the hospital, trying to reach Josh with no success my mum went to his mother’s house, the response was inhuman as usual, I’ve never known anything good of this woman, i understand she’s being protective of her son but I’ve known her to be reckless, sad and wicked. Even though i warned my mum not to go all the way, we just had to try our luck.
The decision to keep the child wasn’t just my decision or my mum’s, Dr Olu also advised it, he had said trying to get rid of it wasn’t only sinful but dangerous considering the state of my health. I have been living at my aunt’s place growing lean and sick by the day, as much as i tried to console myself i couldn’t but find myself in tears day in day out.
Days passed, months flew, the arrival of my wonder child was fast approaching, mother left all her work in kogi, took the last 6weeks off to stay with me at Aunty’s house since her husband was out of the country. Together we went to Ibadan to get a referral letter and also to see my therapist, i was due in 5weeks but it looked like i was going drop the baggage in no time. Just before i said my goodbyes to Dr Olu and smiling at his promise to see me immediately i deliver. I gazed towards the corridor. I saw Aman and his grandmother, i tried to rush back into the doctor’s office but my mum was already behind me. I was shy and ashamed.
“Hi Aisha, how have you been? I always ask of you from Dr olu, do you remember me?”. “Of course i do, Aman right?” Yes, your are right. I have missed your innocent face. Not so innocent as you can see, showing him my big belly. Oh my God! You are almost popping, do you need me to carry you? He said as he laughed. Some how i genuinely smiled back “I’m perfect, i carried myself all the way from lagos” lagos?! Why come here for clinic all the way from Lagos? No i didn’t come for clinic, i came for a letter and also for my finally session. I’m good to go, not coming here except necessary.
Oh, so i won’t see you here again? That’s not nice acceptable. He smiled looking at my mum. Dear ma, can i marry your daughter? So i can always see her. She just giggled and said; as you can see, she’s more than married so just don’t waste your time. We all walked towards the car saying goodbyes, i knew he was the only friend i had made in 8months and i wanted to keep in touch, i gave him my number and email address, he promised to always check me whenever he is in Lagos.
The referral letter was for deferring my admission in cyprus, i had gotten the admission letter one month earlier, i wasn’t exactly happy but my mum was, she said having my child wouldn’t stop me from being who i want to be and that i would leave my son with her when I’m strong enough to travel. I don’t even know if its proper or if i would care. I do not in any way feel anything for this child i carry, i always imagined it come to pass (the love of a mother) but now its here, i can’t feel it. I have tried to, i have read a lot of books and my therapist had tried, my last session was full of pretence and promising words. I hope soon, when i have him, i can get hold of the L♥√ع and make it happen. If its not too late.
Aman has been a great caller and now i have something doing on social networks because we chat all the time. He would always pester me for my due date, teasing that he wants to be there for me and how much he cares about me. He obviously asked about the father but i didn’t think he had the right to know. I just wanted to keep my story to myself and the few people that knew. The only thing is how much he makes me laugh and i know secretly my mum appreciates him, because when I’m on the computer chatting and laughing out loud, she automatically knows its him.
On the 17th of september 2010 something life changing happened to me..

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AiSHa n JoSH~ episode 9

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The memories of how my father died played in my mind. It’s been 18years since the tragic accident happened and ever since, my mum and I never talked about it because none of us could understand why. I was just five years old but it was too dark an event not to remember.
My father was the only son of his parents just like my mum. They both met in college. After about 2years together, my mum got pregnant and they decided to keep it because both parents wanted more kids since they couldn’t conceive. A few months later, my maternal and paternal grandparents started having issues as my maternal’s blamed my father for hindering my mum’s career. My father didn’t agree to this. This constant disagreements threw my mum out of my grandparent’s house since my father didn’t have an apartment of his own. According to my mum, my father would come see her twice a day. He would rock me in his arms and even make sure I’m asleep at night before he leaves.
Katsina isn’t exactly big, but my father rode town to town daily just to see my innocent face. Finally, he got a good job in my mother’s hometown and rented an apartment. We lived and grew in it together till that dark night. We had no power in the area, I can remember vividly even though I was only five. We had used a broken lantern to light the house and had all slept off. I have no idea how the fire started but that’s how everything we had went down. My father saved me but had several burns and continual convulsion. The doctors said his lungs were damaged and even though his parents had a lot of money, it wasn’t enough at the time death came knocking. Abu Abubakar, my father, was 29 years old when he died in the state hospital. He died so I could live. Will I loose my mum too?
Dr Olu walked towards me and placed his hands on my shoulder. I shivered and cried. With eyes filled with tears, I looked into his eyes and asked with fear “please, where is my mother”?? They all chorused, “she went to get something”! It seemed like a planned response. I scream and fell to the ground. I must have fainted, because by the time I woke up, I had a blurred vision and severe headache. I could feel the heat from my body. My mother was there, she wore her white Jalabiyah, holding my feet and caressing them. I thought I had died too until I heard another voice. It was my aunt’s. She called on a nurse that I was awake. Then I wondered and then realised I was actually awake. “Mum, what happened”? I asked with anxiety. She responded “nothing, I only went to get you a small bag to put your purse”. She further asked “what happened my daughter? Are you ready to go home? Or don’t you want to go to Aunty Sidi’s place? All the questions, All her fears and worries, I just hugged her and smiled. I replied “nothing, I was just scared, I thought I had lost you. Please don’t ever leave me mum”.

Some doctors really need to learn how to give news, good or bad. I could have died or lost my mind, the thought of bearing that pain could have dropped my heart dead. The nurse had come back into the room with Dr Olu. He said jokingly, that I was full of drama and fear and that I needed to overcome my fear to avoid high blood pressure. He also pleaded with me not to hurt myself or my mum or even my offsprings. OFFSPRINGS??? I laughed out loud and couldn’t stop. I don’t intend getting married soon and even if I do, because of my mum, it won’t be anytime soon. He sat beside me and told me not to panic.

Dr Olu: Aisha, you know bad things happen to people for reasons only best known to God

Aisha: Yes, I do

Dr Olu: You have passed the test of time and fate, no one can hurt you again

Aisha: Oh yes, I believe insha Allah

Dr Olu: Good, so whatever happens next is God’s will right?

Aisha: Yes doctor 🙂

Dr Olu: Earlier today we were trying to tell you something but your fears made you believe it was because you lost your mum.

Aisha: Dr, I’m sorry, you all scared me

Dr Olu: I’m sorry about that

Aisha: No problem, I just want to go home. I’m feeling better

Dr Olu: Yes you will, but promise
me you won’t be afraid or worried

Aisha: I promise

Dr Olu: Thank you. We have checked all your vitals and they are in good shape. However, the STI is suppressed, you need to complete the doses and come back for check up or go to the referred hospital in lagos. We also did some very important tests for people in your condition and we are sorry to tell you that you are PREGNANT!

Aisha: What?!!! How is that possible??

Dr Olu: We are yet to find out but I’m hoping it’s your boyfriend

Shame and tears rolled down my eyes as I felt I had let my mum down AGAIN. She held me close and said the sweetest things to me. I am finished. Why are all these things happening to me? Why would fate choose this for me? Why? Why??

Then I remembered what I’ve tried so hard to forget, I was raped by four men. Joshua inclusive. Who is the father?????

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world malaria day

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Malaria is a dangerous disease with pregnant women and children most vulnerable. Mortein Insecticide calls on all women across Africa to join Mortein and fight against malaria. World Malaria Day is April 25, 2012. Song composed by Cobhams Asuquo Lyrics by Cobhams Asuquo and Omawumi Director – Iykeman (Urban Touch)

World Malaria Day is commemorated every year on 25 April and recognizes global efforts to control malaria. Globally, 3.3 billion people in 106 countries are at risk of malaria. In 2009, 781 000 people died from malaria, mainly women and children in Africa.

According to the World malaria report 2011, there were about 216 million cases of malaria (with an uncertainty range of 149 million to 274 million) and an estimated 655 000 deaths in 2010 (with an uncertainty range of 537 000 to 907 000). Malaria mortality rates have fallen by more than 25% globally since 2000, and by 33% in the WHO African Region. Most deaths occur among children living in Africa where a child dies every minute from malaria.

So let’s support this by first keeping a clean environment, personal protection against mosquitoe bites, spraying of insecticide, using mosquitoe nets and get immune as a pregnant woman or support this children : “http://communityimpactng.wordpress.com/2012/04/24/net-a-child-project/”>